Mobility and Congestion in Dynamical Multilayer Networks with Finite Storage Capacity

Multilayer networks describe well many real interconnected communication and transportation systems, ranging from computer networks to multimodal mobility infrastructures. Here, we introduce a model in which the nodes have a limited capacity of storing and processing the agents moving over a multilayer network, and their congestions trigger temporary faults which, in turn, dynamically affect the routing of agents seeking for uncongested paths. The study of the network performance under different layer velocities and node maximum capacities, reveals the existence of delicate trade-offs between the number of served agents and their time to travel to destination. We provide analytical estimates of the optimal buffer size at which the travel time is minimum and of its dependence on the velocity and number of links at the different layers. Phenomena reminiscent of the Slower Is Faster (SIF) effect and of the Braess’ paradox are observed in our dynamical multilayer set-up.

 

Mobility and Congestion in Dynamical Multilayer Networks with Finite Storage Capacity
Sabato Manfredi, Edmondo Di Tucci, Vito Latora

Source: arxiv.org