Complexity Digest 2008.04    24-Jan-2008

PDF files of our annual editions are available at www.comdig.de/AnnualEditions.html

A
letter from Gottfried Mayer to our readers and friends is at http://www.comdig.de/GMLetter.html
  Archive: http://comdig.unam.mx
  "I think the next century will be the century of complexity." Stephen Hawking, 2000.

  1. Year Of Planet Earth, Nature
    1. Ocean Circulation In A Warming Climate, Nature
    2. Terrestrial Ecosystem Carbon Dynamics And Climate Feedbacks, Nature
    3. An Earth-System Perspective Of The Global Nitrogen Cycle, Nature
    4. Small-Scale Cloud Processes And Climate, Nature
    5. Rain Power: Harvesting Energy from the Sky, PhysOrg.com
  2. A Thirst For Meat: Changes In Diet, Rising Population May Strain China's Water Supply, Science News
    1. The New Role Of Oil Wealth In The World Economy, McKinsey Quarterly
  3. Ecology: Managing Coastal Wetlands, Science
  4. Recovery From The Most Profound Mass Extinction Of All Time, Proc. Biol. Sc.
    1. Evolution Of Human Genome's 'Guardian' Gives People Unique Protections From DNA Damage, ScienceDaily
    2. Fatal Attraction: Carnivorous Plants Roll Out The Red Carpet To Lure Insects, Biol. Lett.
  5. Evolutionary Genetics: Polynesians Took the Express Train Through Melanesia to the Pacific, Science
  6. Going Global - Is The Future Bright?, Innovations-report
  7. Neuroscience: Mirror Neurons May Help Songbirds Stay in Tune, Science
    1. Behavioural Neuroscience: Neurons Of Imitation, Nature
  8. Neuroscience: Organizing the Source of Memory, Science
    1. Effects Of Molecular Memory And Bursting On Fluctuations In Gene Expression, Science
  9. Misreading The Mind, LATimes
    1. 'Mind-Reading' Car Keeps Drivers Focused, New Scientist
  10. The Correlation Of Learning Speed And Natural Foraging Success In Bumble-Bees, Proc. Biol. Sc.
  11. DNA-Based Artificial Nose, Technology Review
  12. Tiny Genetic Differences Have Huge Consequences, PhysOrg.com
    1. Targeted Gene Therapy Provides Relief For Chronic Pain, Study Shows, Science Daily
  13. Getting The Red Out: Drug Improves Kids' Psoriasis Symptoms, Science News
  14. 'Surrogate Goals' May Mislead Patients, USA Today
    1. Selective Reporting Of Antidepressant Trials Exaggerates Drug Effectiveness, Report Finds, Science Daily
  15. Déjà Vu—A Study Of Duplicate Citations In Medline, Bioinformatics
  16. Cancer: Hay In A Haystack, Nature
  17. Cloning Said to Yield Human Embryos, NY Times
  18. Ant Parasite Turns Host Into Ripe Red Berry, Innovations-report
  19. Complex Challenges: Global Terrorist Networks
    1. Cell Phone Sensors Detect Radiation To Thwart Nuclear Terrorism, Science Daily
    2. Tunnel Vision On Iraq Hampers Broader Terrorist Fight, Seattle Times
  20. Links & Snippets
    1. Other Publications
    2. Webcast Announcements
    3. Conference Announcements
    4. Other Announcements

  1. Year Of Planet Earth, Nature Bookmark and Share

    Excerpts: As we progress into the twenty-first century, modern society faces one of its greatest challenges - climate change. Earth scientists are uniquely placed to help tackle this issue, as well as to help society reduce the risks from natural hazards and use Earth's resources sustainably.

    To achieve these goals, it is essential that Earth scientists and society interact in mutually beneficial ways (...).

    • Source: Year Of Planet Earth, Joanna Thorpe, Juliane Moessinger, & John VanDecar, DOI: 10.1038/451257a

    1. Ocean Circulation In A Warming Climate, Nature Bookmark and Share

      Excerpts: Climate models predict that the ocean's circulation will weaken in response to global warming, but the warming at the end of the last ice age suggests a different outcome.

      There is an old truism in climate circles that the cold climate at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), which occurred 21,000 years ago, had stronger winds. This idea fits with the common observation that it is windier in the winter than in the summer because there is greater thermal contrast within the atmosphere in the winter hemisphere. Temperature reconstructions from the LGM show that Equator-to-pole gradients in sea surface temperature were indeed larger - that is, the polar oceans were colder than the tropical ocean at the LGM in comparison with the temperature differences today.


    2. Terrestrial Ecosystem Carbon Dynamics And Climate Feedbacks, Nature Bookmark and Share

      Excerpts: Recent evidence suggests that, on a global scale, terrestrial ecosystems will provide a positive feedback in a warming world, albeit of uncertain magnitude.

      It has only been recognized relatively recently that biological processes can control and steer the Earth system in a globally significant way. Terrestrial ecosystems constitute a major player in this respect: they can release or absorb globally relevant greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide (CO2), methane and nitrous oxide, they emit aerosols and aerosol precursors, and they control exchanges of energy, water and momentum between the atmosphere and the land surface.


    3. An Earth-System Perspective Of The Global Nitrogen Cycle, Nature Bookmark and Share

      Excerpts: With humans having an increasing impact on the planet, the interactions between the nitrogen cycle, the carbon cycle and climate are expected to become an increasingly important determinant of the Earth system.

    4. Small-Scale Cloud Processes And Climate, Nature Bookmark and Share

      Excerpts: Clouds constitute the largest single source of uncertainty in climate prediction. A better understanding of small-scale cloud processes could shed light on the role of clouds in the climate system.

      Clouds control Earth's weather and regulate its climate. They cool Earth's atmosphere by reflecting incoming visible-wavelength solar radiation and warm its surface by trapping outgoing infrared radiation. Clouds produce the rain and snow that dominate Earth's weather and shape Earth's landscapes and vegetation zones.


    5. Rain Power: Harvesting Energy from the Sky, PhysOrg.com Bookmark and Share

      Excerpts:
      The testing apparatus controlled drop size, frequency, and height, as drops of water fell and impacted a piezoelectric material at the base. Credit: Romain Guigon, et al.
      Scientists from CEA/Leti-Minatec, an R&D institute in Grenoble, France, specializing in microelectronics, have recently developed a system that recovers the vibration energy from a piezoelectric structure impacted by a falling raindrop. The system works with raindrops ranging in diameter from 1 to 5 mm, and simulations show that it's possible to recover up to 12 milliwatts from one of the larger"downpour" drops.

      "Our work could be considered as a good alternative to power systems in raining outdoor environments where solar energy is difficult to exploit,"


  2. A Thirst For Meat: Changes In Diet, Rising Population May Strain China's Water Supply, Science News Bookmark and Share

    Excerpts: The recent trend toward increased meat consumption in China is aggravating the country's relative shortage of water, says Sandra Postel, director of the Global Water Policy Project in Amherst, Mass. While the nation is home to about 21 percent of the planet's population, it has only 8 percent of its renewable water resources, she notes. More than one-third of the world's population lives in regions where water is considered scarce (SN: 7/20/02, p. 42).

    1. The New Role Of Oil Wealth In The World Economy, McKinsey Quarterly Bookmark and Share

      Excerpts: As oil prices continue to set new records, investors outside Europe and the United States are increasingly shaping trends in financial markets. The influence of these investors is likely to continue to grow over at least the next five years. Without a doubt, this flood of oil money is creating new dynamics in world markets and fueling growing concern about government connections and influence on markets. Since facts about these powerful new investors have been scarce, McKinsey's research aims to ground the debate by providing data and analysis, including where this new wealth is held, how it affects markets, and what the players might do to address growing concerns over their influence.

  3. Ecology: Managing Coastal Wetlands, Science Bookmark and Share

    Excerpts: Wetland management may be improved by evaluating nonlinear relationships of economic value and ecological services. (...)

    Previous work has suggested that the more salt marsh area present, the greater the likely harvest of shrimp in adjacent coastal waters (4). Such linear results suggest that the best course is to protect as much of these environments as possible; this has largely been the basis for management strategies. Barbier et al. show that for at least one ecological service provided by wetlands such as marshes and mangroves--the wave attenuation service that protects coastal areas from storms and tsunamis--the relation between service and wetland area is not linear, but is decidedly curved.


  4. Recovery From The Most Profound Mass Extinction Of All Time, Proc. Biol. Sc. Bookmark and Share

    Excerpts: The end-Permian mass extinction, 251 million years (Myr) ago, was the most devastating ecological event of all time, and it was exacerbated by two earlier events at the beginning and end of the Guadalupian, 270 and 260Myr ago. Ecosystems were destroyed worldwide, communities were restructured and organisms were left struggling to recover. Disaster taxa (...) insinuated themselves into almost every corner of the sparsely populated landscape in the earliest Triassic, and a quick taxonomic recovery apparently occurred on a global scale. However, close study of ecosystem evolution shows that true ecological recovery was slower. After the end-Guadalupian event, faunas began rebuilding complex trophic structures (...).

    1. Evolution Of Human Genome's 'Guardian' Gives People Unique Protections From DNA Damage, ScienceDaily Bookmark and Share

      Excerpts: Human evolution has created enhancements in key genes connected to the p53 regulatory network -- the so-called guardian of the genome -- by creating additional safeguards in human genes to boost the network's ability to guard against DNA damage that could cause cancer or a variety of genetic diseases, (...). Because genetically engineered mouse models are increasingly powerful tools in understanding the risks and mechanisms of human diseases -- and rodents do not have the same evolution-based safeguards in p53 function as humans -- the study also underscores the need for additional considerations in the interpretation of research using rodent models. (...)

    2. Fatal Attraction: Carnivorous Plants Roll Out The Red Carpet To Lure Insects, Biol. Lett. Bookmark and Share

      Excerpt: We provide the first experimental test of the hypothesis that the coloration of carnivorous plants can act as a signal to lure insects and thus enhance capture rates. An experimental approach was needed to separate effects of the visual appearance of plants from those of traits that may correlate with appearance and also affect capture rates. We compared insect capture rates of pitcher plants with artificially coloured red and green pitchers in a paired design, and found that plants with red pitchers captured significantly more flying insects. Thus, we present the first experimental evidence of visual signalling in carnivorous plants. (...)

  5. Evolutionary Genetics: Polynesians Took the Express Train Through Melanesia to the Pacific, Science Bookmark and Share

    Excerpts: A new study published this week supports the "express train" theory of the peopling of the far-flung islands of Remote Oceania, which posits that people from Taiwan moved rapidly through Melanesia, leaving little genetic footprint.

    (...) Polynesians bear a much closer relationship to aboriginal inhabitants of Taiwan than to the Melanesian groups who occupied New Guinea and surrounding islands from 50,000 to 30,000 years ago.


  6. Going Global - Is The Future Bright?, Innovations-report Bookmark and Share

    Excerpts: The global economy is entering a dramatic, virtual phase of development claims a new book, Going Global, (...).(...) argue that, in the future, more and more people will work in virtual worlds like Second Life. A growing number of companies like IBM are already establishing a presence in Second Life. Earnings in Second Life can be converted into US dollars and some people are even giving a Second Life address on their business cards. In the future it is likely that the distinction between work and leisure will blur as virtual games provide individuals with a second income in their spare time. (...)

  7. Neuroscience: Mirror Neurons May Help Songbirds Stay in Tune, Science Bookmark and Share

    Excerpts: In work published this week, researchers describe mirror neurons in songbirds that fire when a bird sings or hears another bird sing a song similar to its own, a finding that may pave the way to insights into how songbirds learn and maintain their complex songs.

    1. Behavioural Neuroscience: Neurons Of Imitation, Nature Bookmark and Share

      Excerpts: In songbirds, a class of neurons shows a striking similarity in activity when the bird sings and when it hears a similar song. This mirroring neuronal activity could contribute to imitation.

      Songbirds are champion mimics. A nightingale, for example, can imitate at least 60 different songs after a few exposures to each. A young bird learns its species' song through imitation, and the ability is also socially important: a bird on its territory will often respond to an intruder's song by singing a similar song, thus acknowledging the intrusion. What neurons might mediate these imitative and communicative powers?


  8. Neuroscience: Organizing the Source of Memory, Science Bookmark and Share

    Excerpts: Signals from the midline of the embryonic brain direct formation of the hippocampus.

    The hippocampus is essential for a meaningful human life. Without it, we cannot form new memories. Engaging in a normal social life would not be possible because new experiences would fade from memory within minutes (1). In keeping with its complex function, the hippocampus, part of the brain's cerebral cortex, has a distinctive, intricate anatomy.


    1. Effects Of Molecular Memory And Bursting On Fluctuations In Gene Expression, Science Bookmark and Share

      Excerpts: Many cellular components are present in such low numbers per cell that random births and deaths of individual molecules can cause substantial "noise" in concentrations. But biochemical events do not necessarily occur in single steps of individual molecules. Some processes are greatly randomized when synthesis or degradation occurs in large bursts of many molecules during a short time interval. Conversely, each birth or death of a macromolecule could involve several small steps, creating a memory between individual events.

  9. Misreading The Mind, LATimes Bookmark and Share

    Excerpts: One day, we'll look back at the history of neuroscience and realize that reductionism was just the first phase. Each year, tens of thousands of neuroscience papers are published in scientific journals. The field is introduced to countless new acronyms, pathways and proteins. At a certain point, however, all of this detail starts to have diminishing returns. After all, the real paradox of the brain is why it feels like more than the sum of its parts. How does our pale gray matter become the Technicolor cinema of consciousness? What transforms the water of the brain into the wine of the mind? Where does the self come from?

    1. 'Mind-Reading' Car Keeps Drivers Focused, New Scientist Bookmark and Share

      Excerpts: During the experiments EEG electrodes attached to the volunteers' heads monitored brain activity.

      Crucially, when brain activity rose above a predefined threshold, the brain-interface device was rigged up to switch off the secondary task - clicking the steering wheel buttons. Being freed from this task speeded up subjects' reactions times by an average of 100 milliseconds.

      In a real-life situation, such a device might be programmed to switch off superfluous information systems when the drivers' brain is already over-loaded by other stimuli, such as a conversation with other passengers, (...).


  10. The Correlation Of Learning Speed And Natural Foraging Success In Bumble-Bees, Proc. Biol. Sc. Bookmark and Share

    Excerpt: Despite the widespread assumption that the learning abilities of animals are adapted to the particular environments in which they operate, the quantitative effects of learning performance on fitness remain virtually unknown. Here, we evaluate the learning performance of bumble-bees (Bombus terrestris) from multiple colonies in an ecologically relevant associative learning task under laboratory conditions, before testing the foraging performance of the same colonies under the field conditions. We demonstrate that variation in learning speed among bumble-bee colonies is directly correlated with the foraging performance, a robust fitness measure, under natural conditions. Colonies vary in learning speed by a factor of nearly five, (...)

  11. DNA-Based Artificial Nose, Technology Review Bookmark and Share

    Excerpts:
    Smart sniffer: Cogniscent's electronic nose (above) now uses sensors made from short sequences of single-stranded DNA that can detect toxic and explosive chemicals in the air. Credit: Cogniscent
    Single-stranded DNA can be used to identify explosives and other airborne compounds.

    Scientists have found a way to quickly identify which DNA sequences are ideal for detecting a particular odor and turn dried DNA into odor detectors. While many researchers are working on an electronic nose to detect toxins and explosives, this new platform could be used to create a wide array of sensors using existing high-throughput molecular-biology equipment.


  12. Tiny Genetic Differences Have Huge Consequences, PhysOrg.com Bookmark and Share

    Excerpts: The study, part of the Genome Regulators in Disease (GRID) Project funded by Genome Canada and Genome Quebec, was led by Dr. Jacek Majewski of McGill University's Department of Human Genetics and the McGill University and Genome Quebec Innovation Centre, and first-authored by his research associate Dr. Tony Kwan. It was published January 13 in the journal Nature Genetics.

    The study was originally initiated by Dr. Tom Hudson, former director of the McGill University and Genome Quebec Innovation Centre, and drew upon the data collected by the vast HapMap (Haplotype Map) Project, a global comparative map of the human genome, which Hudson and his colleagues were instrumental in completing.


    1. Targeted Gene Therapy Provides Relief For Chronic Pain, Study Shows, Science Daily Bookmark and Share

      Excerpts: Mount Sinai researchers designed a viral vector to carry the prepro-b-endorphin gene into primary sensory neurons in order to activate opiate receptors selectively, in a rat model. The agents were delivered directly into the spinal fluid of rats via a lumbar puncture, or spinal tap with only one injection. Results showed that the rats remained symptom-free for an extended period of time.

      "Our research found that treating chronic pain with Adeno-Associated Virus vector-based gene therapy allows for pain relief for more than three months after a single injection, targeting selectively the pain gate.


  13. Getting The Red Out: Drug Improves Kids' Psoriasis Symptoms, Science News Bookmark and Share

    Excerpts: Etanercept blocks the inflammation underlying psoriasis by targeting a key inflammatory protein called TNF-alpha, (...).

    Approval would provide clinicians with an alternative to other immune suppressants such as methotrexate and cyclosporine. (...)

    Etanercept's specific targeting of TNF-alpha allows other immune processes to continue to protect the body, :(...).
    Editor's Note: From Wikipedia: "Tumor necrosis factor (TNF, cachexin or cachectin and formally known as tumor necrosis factor-alpha) is a cytokine (tumor necrosis factors) involved in systemic inflammation and is a member of a group of cytokines that all stimulate the acute phase reaction. TNF causes apoptotic cell death, cellular proliferation, differentiation, inflammation, tumorigenesis, and viral replication. TNF's primary role is in the regulation of immune cells."


  14. 'Surrogate Goals' May Mislead Patients, USA Today Bookmark and Share

    Excerpts: Patients might have been left scratching their heads over news that an expensive, widely prescribed cholesterol-lowering drug left arteries no better off than a cheap generic statin. The just-released findings about Vytorin raise questions about the speed with which drug companies publicize less-favorable results. In addition, the data provide another example of how drug trials' widely used "surrogate goals" - easier-to-study intermediate steps, such as lower cholesterol, that stand in for what patients really care about, such as fewer heart attacks - could be misleading.
    Editor's Note: This article shows consequences of a linear, reductionistic view of our body interaction with drugs: Lower cholesterol does not always have to be good for our health.

    1. Selective Reporting Of Antidepressant Trials Exaggerates Drug Effectiveness, Report Finds, Science Daily Bookmark and Share

      Excerpts: Selective publication in reporting results of antidepressant trials exaggerates the effectiveness of the drugs, according to a report in the January 17 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine (...)

      For trials that had been published, they compared the published version of the results with the FDA version of the results.

      Whether and how the studies were published depended on how they turned out, Turner's team found. According to the published literature, nearly all studies conducted (94 percent) had positive treatment results, but FDA data showed that in fact only about half (51 percent) of the studies were positive.


  15. Déjà Vu-A Study Of Duplicate Citations In Medline, Bioinformatics Bookmark and Share

    Excerpt: Motivation: Duplicate publication impacts the quality of the scientific corpus, has been difficult to detect, and studies this far have been limited in scope and size. Using text similarity searches, we were able to identify signatures of duplicate citations among a body of abstracts. Results: A sample of 62 213 Medline citations was examined and a database of manually verified duplicate citations was created to study author publication behavior. We found that 0.04% of the citations with no shared authors were highly similar and are thus potential cases of plagiarism. 1.35% with shared authors were sufficiently similar to be considered a duplicate. (...)
    • Source: Déjà Vu—A Study Of Duplicate Citations In Medline, M. Errami, 0 J. M. Hicks, W. Fisher, D. Trusty, J. D. Wren, T. C. Long, H. R. Garner - harold.garnerautsouthwestern.edu, DOI: 10.1093/bioinformatics/btm574, Bioinformatics, Jan. 15; 2008, online 2007/12/01
    • Contributed by Pritha Das - prithadas01ayahoo.com

  16. Cancer: Hay In A Haystack, Nature Bookmark and Share

    Excerpts: Although some diseases occur when both copies of a gene are mutated, mutation of just one copy of certain tumour-suppressor genes promotes tumorigenesis. Identifying such mutations is arduous, but worth the effort.
    • Source: Cancer: Hay In A Haystack, Kevin M. Shannon, Michelle M. Le Beau, DOI: 10.1038/451252a, Nature 451, 252-253, 08/01/17

  17. Cloning Said to Yield Human Embryos, NY Times Bookmark and Share

    Excerpts: The work represents a step toward the promise of creating personalized embryonic stem cells that could be used for medical treatments. Although the embryos grew only to a very early stage, the work could also theoretically be seen as a step toward creating babies that are genetic copies of other people.

    Scientists at the company, Stemagen, which is based in San Diego, said Thursday that they were the first to use human adult cells to create cloned embryos that advanced to the stage known as a blastocyst, from which embryonic stem cells typically are extracted.


  18. Ant Parasite Turns Host Into Ripe Red Berry, Innovations-report Bookmark and Share

    Excerpts: A newly discovered parasite so dramatically transforms its host, an ant, that the ant comes to resemble a juicy red berry, ripe for picking, according to a report (...). This is the first example of fruit mimicry caused by a parasite, the co-authors say. Presumably, the dramatic change in appearance and behavior tricks birds into eating infected ants - parasites and all - so that the bird can spread the parasite in its feces. The fruit-eating birds' droppings, which are mostly seeds and insect parts, are gathered by other ants who then feed and unwittingly infect their young. (...)

  19. Complex Challenges: Global Terrorist Networks Bookmark and Share


    1. Cell Phone Sensors Detect Radiation To Thwart Nuclear Terrorism, Science Daily Bookmark and Share

      Excerpts: Researchers at Purdue University are working with the state of Indiana to develop a system that would use a network of cell phones to detect and track radiation to help prevent terrorist attacks with radiological "dirty bombs" and nuclear weapons. (...)

      The system was developed by Andrew Longman, a consulting instrumentation scientist. Longman developed the software for the system and then worked with Purdue researchers to integrate the software with radiation detectors and cell phones. Cellular data air time was provided by AT&T.


    2. Tunnel Vision On Iraq Hampers Broader Terrorist Fight, Seattle Times Bookmark and Share

      Excerpts: The Bush administration's fixation on Iraq costs us dearly in the struggle to comprehensively confront the threat to global peace and stability presented by al-Qaida and its allies. President Bush's final term in office is almost up, though, and the next president will have the opportunity to forge a better strategy.

      Our special-operations forces are the "tip of the spear" confronting al-Qaida and its allies - the forces in our military best trained at all the facets of counterinsurgency needed to confront these global terrorist networks.


  20. Links & Snippets Bookmark and Share


    1. Other Publications Bookmark and Share

      1. Astronomy: New Dark-Matter Map Reveals Where Galaxies Gambol, Govert Schilling, 08/01/18, Science: 270. The most detailed map of dark matter ever made confirms that galaxies cluster together where the density of the mysterious dark stuff is highest.
      2. Archaeology: Seeking the Roots of Ritual, 08/01/18, Science : 278-280. In the hills of Turkey, researchers are slowly uncovering the world's oldest monumental structures, strange monoliths built by hunter-gatherers perhaps 11,000 years ago.
      3. Physics: Probing Quantum Magnetism with Cold Atoms, Maciej Lewenstein, Anna Sanpera, 08/01/18, Science : 292-293. The interactions of atoms held in an optical trap reveal fundamental mechanisms of magnetism.
      4. Phoenix Heart: Replacing A Heart's Cells Could Ease Transplants, 08/01/19, ScienceNews, Scientists removed all the cells from a dead rat heart, injected new heart cells, and produced a beating heart, paving the way for eventually growing organs for transplantation in humans.
      5. Dusty Fireball: Can Lab-Made Blob Explain Ball Lightning?, 08/01/19, ScienceNews, Artificial cousins of ball lightning contain microscopic particles, just like a model says they should.
      6. When Mice Fly: Bat DNA Leads To Longer Limbs In Mouse Embryos, 08/01/19, ScienceNews, Mice with a stretch of bat DNA grow longer limbs, a possible step in the evolutionary path to wings.
      7. Night Lights May Foster Cancer, 08/01/19, ScienceNews, Regularly working through the night appears to come at a steep cost¡Xa heightened risk of cancer.
      8. Butterfly's Clock Linked To Compass, 08/01/19, ScienceNews, The most detailed look yet at the monarch butterfly's daily rhythm keeper suggests it's closer to ancient forms than to the fruit fly's or mouse's inner clock.
      9. FBI Warns Of Malicious Email Scam: Beware Of Feds Bearing Gifts, I. Thomson, 2008/01/16, vnunet.com
      10. Cells Get Sprayed, 2008/01/17, Innovations-report
      11. Contact Lenses With Circuits, Lights A Possible Platform For Superhuman Vision, 2008/01/17, ScienceDaily
      12. The Use Of History And Cultural Heritage In Metal Scene, 2008/01/18, Innovations-report
      13. Do Today's Young People Really Think They Are So Extraordinary?, 2008/01/18, ScienceDaily
      14. Does Your Pet Seem Almost Human? It May Be A Clever Response To Loneliness, 2008/01/20, ScienceDaily
      15. Emotional Modulation Of Body-Selective Visual Areas, M. V. Peelen - mariuspeelenahotmail.com, A. P. Atkinson, F. Andersson, P. Vuilleumier, Dec. 2007, Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience, DOI: 10.1093/scan/nsm023
      16. Computing Topological Parameters Of Biological Networks, Y. Assenov albrecht@mpi-inf.mpg.de, F. Ramírez, S.-E. Schelhorn, T. Lengauer, M. Albrecht, Jan. 15; 2008, online 2007/11/15, Bioinformatics, DOI: 10.1093/bioinformatics/btm554
      17. The Comparative Politics Of Climate Change, K. Harrison, L. M. Sundstrom, Nov. 2007, Online 2007/12/04, Global Environmental Politics, DOI: 10.1162/glep.2007.7.4.1

    2. Webcast Announcements Bookmark and Share

      1. 7th Intl Conf on Complex Systems (ICCS), Boston, MA, 07/10/28-11/02
      2. Reseau Nationale des Systemes Complexes , (in French), 2007
      3. World Economic Forum , Davos, Switzerland, 08/01/22-27
      4. TED Talks, TED Conferences LLC , since 2006
      5. Talking Robots: The PodCast on Robotics and AI, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Switzerland, 06/11/03
      6. Potentials of Complexity Science for Business, Governments, and the Media 2006, Budapest, Hungary, 06/08/03-05
      7. 6th Intl Conf on Complex Systems (ICCS), Boston, MA, 06/06/25-30
      8. Artificial Life X, 10th Intl Conf on the Simulation and Synthesis of Living Systems, Bloomington, IN, USA. 2006/06/03-07
      9. 6th Understanding Complex Systems Symposium, Urbana-Champaign, Il, 06/05/15-18
      10. Ralph Abraham on Complexity Digest, , Calcutta, India, 05/12/27
      11. An Afternoon with Michael Crichton, Washington, 05/11/06
      12. Illuminating the Shadow of the Future, Ann Arbor, Mi 05/09/23-25
      13. Open Network of Centres of Excellence in Complex Systems - Brainstorming Meeting, Paris, France 05/09/19-23
      14. Complexity, Science & Society Conference 2005, U. Liverpool, UK 2005/09/11-14
      15. ECAL 2005 - VIIIth European Conference on Artificial Life, Canterbury, Kent, UK 2005/09/5-9
      16. T. Irene Sanders, Executive Director and Founder, The Washington Center for Complexity & Public Policy, 05/08/27, QuickTime video (10:38 min), Podcast
      17. North American Society for the Psychology of Sport and Physical Activity 2005 Conference, Virtual Conference Network, St. Pete's Beach, Florida, 05/06/09-11
      18. Understanding Complex Systems - Computational Complexity and Bioinformatics, Virtual Conference Network, Urbana-Champaign, Il, UIUC, 05/05/16-19
      19. Nonlinearity, Fluctuations, and Complexity, with a celebration of the 65th birthday of Gregoire Nicolis. , Complexity Session, Universite' Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium, 05/03/16
      20. 1st European Conference on Complex Systems, Torino, Italy, 04/12/5-7
      21. From Autopoiesis to Neurophenomenology: A Tribute to Francisco Varela (1946-2001), Paris, France, 2004/06/18-20
      22. Evolutionary Epistemology, Language, and Culture, Brussels, Belgium, 04/05/26-28
      23. International Conference on Complex Systems 2004, Boston, 04/05/16-21
      24. Nonlinear Dynamics And Chaos: Lab Demonstrations, Strogatz, Steven H., Internet-First University Press, 1994
      25. CERN Webcast Service, Streamed videos of Archived Lectures and Live Events
      26. Dean LeBaron's Archive of Daily Video Commentary, Ongoing Since February 1998
      27. Edge Videos


    3. Conference Announcements Bookmark and Share

      1. The 1st Conf on Artificial General Intelligence (AGI-08), Memphis, Tennessee, USA, 08/03/01-03
      2. The 3rd Intl Nonlinear Sciences Conference (INSC), Tokyo, Japan, 08/03/13-15
      3. 19th European Meeting On Cybernetics And Systems Research, (EMCSR 2008), Vienna, Austria, 08/03/25-28
      4. 2nd KES Intl Symp on Agent and Multi-Agent Systems : Technologies and Applications, Incheon, Korea, 08/03/26-28
      5. Nexus for Change II, Bowling Green, OH, 08/03/29-04/01
      6. 2nd Applied Neuroscience Meeting, Monterrey, Mexico, 08/04/03-06
      7. Fumee 1 - 1St Futures Meeting - Understanding Anticipatory Systems, Rovereto (Italy), 08/04/10-12
      8. 1st Intl Conf on Social Entrepreneurship & Complexity, Garden City, NY, USA, 08/04/10-12
      9. Emergence In The Physical And Biological World: A Notion In Search Of Clarification, Erice (Italy), 08/04/12-16
      10. CHAOS2008 Chaotic Modeling and Simulation International Conference, Chania, Crete, Greece, 08/06/03-06
      11. International Conference on Chaos, Complexity & Conflict, Omaha, NE, 08/06/05-07
      12. Cambridge Healthtech Institute's Tenth Annual... Applying Systems Biology, San Francisco, CA, 08/06/09-11
      13. 9th Intl Mathematica Symposium, Maastricht, The Netherlands, 08/06/20-24
      14. The 14th Intl Conf on Auditory Display (ICAD), Paris, France, 08/06/24-27
      15. The 12th World Multi-Conf on Systemics, Cybernetics and Informatics: WMSCI 2008, Orlando, Florida, USA, 08/06/29-07/02
      16. From Animals To Animats 10 - The 10th Intl Conf on the Simulation Of Adaptive Behavior (SAB'08), Osaka, Japan, 08/07/07-12
      17. Complex Systems and Social Simulations, CEU Summer University, Budapest, Hungary, 08/07/07-18
      18. Stochastic Resonance 2008, Perugia, Italy, 08/08/17-21
      19. 1st Intl Workshop on Nonlinear Dynamics and Synchronization (INDS'08), Klagenfurt, Austria, 08/07/18-19
      20. 8th Intl Conf on Epigenetic Robotics: Modeling Cognitive Development in Robotic Systems, Brighton, UK, 08/07/31-08/02


    4. Other Announcements Bookmark and Share

      1. " Wolfram Research is Now the Official Math Brain Trust for the Hit CBS Series NUMB3RS. 07/10/05
      2. A short notice from Dean LeBaron

        Dear ComDig Readers,

        Our editor, Dr. Gottfried Mayer, is affectionately esteemed by many of you -- as readers, you know he devotes himself unselfishly to widening our knowledge of complexity science. He was recently diagnosed with advanced colon cancer and given a timetable of a very few years. Knowing Gottfried, you can imagine that, in addition to the customary processes of chemotherapy, he would explore other frontier therapies, especially those arising out of interdisciplinary applications of complexity. These are expensive ... if he can find them.

        Many of you have sent your good wishes and indicated your desire to assist. With Gottfried's permission, I am posting this note with information, below, about how to send contributions to him. Please indicate the source since Gottfried will want to express his warm gratitude.

        I know that Gottfried, the good scientist that he is, will explain from time to time what he is doing and what the results are ... and we will follow his progress with great interest and hope.

        Dean LeBaron
        Publisher, Complexity Digest

        Bank Information:

        If your contribution is made by check:
        Please mail the check, payable to "Gottfried Mayer", to:
        Manufacturers & Traders Trust
        2080 Western Avenue
        20 Mall
        Guilderland, NY 12084 USA
        (on the back of the check, please write: "For Deposit Only: Account # 983 338 3814")

        If your contribution is made by wire:
        Manufacturers & Traders Trust
        2080 Western Avenue
        20 Mall

        Guilderland, NY 12084 USA
        SWIFT Code# MANTUS33
        UID: 209 791
        ABA routing # 022 00 00 46 [for US wire transfers]
        Account # 983 338 3814
        Ref. Gottfried Mayer

      3. Intl Master of Science in Methods For Management Of Complex Systems - Academic Year 2007-2008, Institute for Advanced Study, Pavia, Italy, 08/01/01
      4. News notes on Agent-based Computational Economics (ACE) for July 2007 are now available on-line, 07/08/04
      5. National Humanities Center Launches Humanities/Sciences Website, 07/04, As part of its ongoing "Autonomy, Singularity, Creativity: The Human & The Humanities" project (ASC), the National Humanities Center makes public a new website for the initiative which significantly expands the potential pool of humanists and scientists engaged in the exploration and examination of topics surrounding the question of human being.



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