Complexity Digest 2006.37

  Archive: http://comdig.unam.mx
  "I think the next century will be the century of complexity." Stephen Hawking, 2000.

  1. First Pass at Cancer Genome Reveals Complex Landscape, Science
    1. Genetic Map Identifies Close To 200 Cancer Genes, Reuters
  2. Peacekeepers Of The Immune System, Scientific American Magazine
    1. Digestive Decoys, Scientific American Magazine
  3. Food For Thought, The New Mexican
  4. For First Time, Doctors Communicate With Patient In Persistent Vegetative State, The Guardian
    1. Is She Conscious?, Science
    2. Detecting Awareness In The Vegetative State, Science
  5. Anticipation Plays A Powerful Role In Human Memory, Brain Study Finds, Innovations-report
  6. Scientists Explore How Complex Organs Develop From A Simple Bud, ScienceDaily
  7. Tectonic Uplift And Eastern Africa Aridification, Science
    1. Colourful Beginning For Humanity, BBC News
  8. The Carbon Cycle On Early Earth-And On Mars?, Phil. Tran. Biol. Sc.
  9. Neanderthals And Humans Lived Side By Side, New Scientist
  10. Temporal And Spatial Enumeration Processes In The Primate Parietal Cortex, Science
    1. How Animals Learn From Each Other, Appl. Animal Behav. Sc.
    2. Into The Brains Of Whales, Appl. Animal Behav. Sc.
  11. Washing Away Your Sins: Threatened Morality And Physical Cleansing, Science
    1. Hybrid Elections Broaden Complexity-Theoretic Resistance to Control, arXiv
  12. Bad-News Beauties Poison-Spined Fish From Asia Have Invaded U.S. Waters, Science
  13. The Art Of The Possible, Technology Review
    1. Top Prize For 'Light' Inventor, BBC News
    2. Inpaint By Numbers, Scientific American Magazine
    3. Ballbots, Scientific American Magazine
    4. Artificial Arrays Could Help Submarines Make Like A Fish
  14. Simple Rules For A Complex Quantum World; The Edge Of Physics, Scientific American
  15. Emergence Is Coupled To Scope, Not Level, arXiv
  16. Discovering Functional Communities in Dynamical Networks, arXiv
  17. Sea Animals Get Tagged For Double-Duty Research, Science
  18. Catalyst Hosts Forum On Complexity And Economic Policy, Yahoo! Finance
  19. Complex Challenges: Global Terrorist Network
    1. Bin Laden Trail 'Stone Cold', Washington Post
    2. Saddam 'Had No Link To Al-Qaeda', BBC News
    3. 'War On Terror' Loses Clear Direction, BBC News
    4. Worried Cia Officers Buy Legal Insurance Plans Fund Defense In Anti-Terror Cases, Washington Post
    5. Bush Tells Group He Sees A 'Third Awakening', Washinton Post
  20. Links & Snippets
    1. Other Publications
    2. Webcast Announcements
    3. Conference Announcements
    4. Call for Papers - Course/Book Announcements

  1. First Pass at Cancer Genome Reveals Complex Landscape, Science Bookmark and Share

    Excerpts: And the abundance of certain types of genes, such as those involved in cell adhesion and transcription, suggested that these processes play a huge role in cancer. (...)

    Verifying that each candidate gene is important to cancer won't be simple. Not only did the cancer genes differ between colon and breast cancers, but each tumor had a different pattern of mutations. The number of genes suggests that there may be more steps to cancer than thought. "It's a much more complex picture than we had anticipated,"(...).


    1. Genetic Map Identifies Close To 200 Cancer Genes, Reuters Bookmark and Share

      Excerpts: The first genetic map of colon and breast cancer shows that nearly 200 mutated genes -- most of them previously unknown -- help tumors start, grow and spread, (...).

      (...) it showed that cancer was more complex than even experts in the genetics of the disease had believed. (...)

      "We expected to find a handful of genes, not 200," (...).

      The researchers said they had identified 189 genes, with an average of 11 per tumor, that were clearly mutated in breast and colon tumors.


  2. Peacekeepers Of The Immune System, Scientific American Magazine Bookmark and Share

    Excerpts: "Horror autotoxicus." A century ago the visionary bacteriologist Paul Ehrlich aptly coined that term to describe an immune system attack against a person's own tissues. Ehrlich thought such autoimmunity--another term he coined--was biologically possible yet was somehow kept in check, but the medical community misconstrued his two-sided idea, believing instead that autoimmunity had to be inherently impossible. After all, what wrong turn of evolution would permit even the chance of horrendous, built-in self-destruction?

    1. Digestive Decoys, Scientific American Magazine Bookmark and Share

      Excerpts: Travelers to the tropics usually try to avoid consuming the local microscopic flora responsible for "Montezuma's revenge" and other, more life-threatening intestinal illnesses. But an Australian research team thinks the best way to protect against those harmful gut bacteria may be to swig more bacteria: specifically, a benign strain of Escherichia coli genetically engineered to absorb other bacteria's toxins. James C. Paton and his colleagues at the University of Adelaide altered a harmless strain of E. coli so that it sports human-like docking sites on the surface of its cell membrane.

  3. Food For Thought, The New Mexican Bookmark and Share

    Excerpts: In a place like Santa Fe, where organic foods are a popular choice among shoppers, Nina Fedoroff would be considered a devil's advocate.

    Here, specialty grocery stores have strong stocking preferences for ingredients that are not molecularly modified, and in the name of personal and planetary health, many shoppers are willing to pay extra for that.

    But Fedoroff, a Pennsylvania State University biology professor, considers such purchasing habits to be misguided nonsense. What's more, she considers such attitudes to be standing in the way of a "very safe and efficient" solution for feeding humanity.


  4. For First Time, Doctors Communicate With Patient In Persistent Vegetative State, The Guardian Bookmark and Share

    Excerpts: A 23-year-old woman who has been in a vegetative state since suffering devastating brain damage in a traffic accident has stunned doctors by performing mental tasks for them. Brain scans revealed that the woman, who has shown no outward signs of awareness since the accident in July last year, could understand people talking to her and was able to imagine playing tennis or walking around her home when asked to by doctors.

    1. Is She Conscious?, Science Bookmark and Share

      Excerpts: In a first experiment conducted 5 months after the accident, Owen and colleagues presented spoken sentences to the patient while recording neural responses with fMRI. Speech-specific brain regions were clearly activated while the patient listened to these sentences, as compared to acoustically matched noise sequences. (...) In sharp contrast to her behaviour, which was suggestive of poor cognitive abilities, this patient could process external auditory information involving language.

      In a second experiment, (...) asking her either to "imagine visiting the rooms in your home" or to "imagine playing tennis."

      • Source: Is She Conscious?, Lionel Naccache, DOI: 10.1126/science.1132881, Science : Vol. 313. no. 5792, pp. 1395 - 1396, 06/09/08

    2. Detecting Awareness In The Vegetative State, Science Bookmark and Share

      Excerpts: We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to demonstrate preserved conscious awareness in a patient fulfilling the criteria for a diagnosis of vegetative state. When asked to imagine playing tennis or moving around her home, the patient activated predicted cortical areas in a manner indistinguishable from that of healthy volunteers.

      The vegetative state is one of the least understood and most ethically troublesome conditions in modern medicine. The term describes a unique disorder in which patients who emerge from coma appear to be awake but show no signs of awareness.

      • Source: Detecting Awareness In The Vegetative State, Adrian M. Owen, Martin R. Coleman, Melanie Boly, Matthew H. Davis, Steven Laureys, John D. Pickard, DOI: 10.1126/science.1130197, Science : Vol. 313. no. 5792, p. 1402, 06/09/08

  5. Anticipation Plays A Powerful Role In Human Memory, Brain Study Finds, Innovations-report Bookmark and Share

    Excerpts: Psychologists have long known that memories of disturbing emotional events - such as an act of violence or the unexpected death of a loved one - are more vivid and deeply imprinted in the brain than mundane recollections of everyday matters. Probing deeper into how such memories form, researchers (...) have found that the mere anticipation of a fearful situation can fire up two memory-forming regions of the brain - even before the event has occurred. That means the simple act of anticipation may play a surprisingly important role in how fresh the memory of a tough experience remains. (...)

  6. Scientists Explore How Complex Organs Develop From A Simple Bud, ScienceDaily Bookmark and Share

    Excerpts: (...) highlights several scientific investigations into the complex biological mechanism known as branching morphogenesis. Through a series of seven laboratory reviews, important insights governing this process during animal development are revealed. The articles analyze how branching morphogenesis occurs in different organ systems in the same species. They also compare the process between simple and complex organisms. Key questions within the reviews --pertaining to the maintenance and repair of cells within adult branched organs, the role of cells only transiently associated with adult organs, (...).

  7. Tectonic Uplift And Eastern Africa Aridification, Science Bookmark and Share

    Excerpts: The history of Eastern African hominids has been linked to a progressive increase of open grassland during the past 8 million years. This trend was explained by global climatic processes, which do not account for the massive uplift of eastern African topography that occurred during this period. Atmosphere and biosphere simulations quantify the role played by these tectonic events. The reduced topographic barrier before 8 million years ago permitted a zonal circulation with associated moisture transport and strong precipitation.
    • Source: Tectonic Uplift And Eastern Africa Aridification, Pierre Sepulchre, Gilles Ramstein, Fr?d?ric Fluteau, Mathieu Schuster, Jean-Jacques Tiercelin, Michel Brunet, DOI: 10.1126/science.1129158, Science: Vol. 313. no. 5792, pp. 1419 - 1423, 06/09/08

    1. Colourful Beginning For Humanity, BBC News Bookmark and Share

      Excerpts:
      This ochre has a groove where the powder has been rubbed out
      Evidence is emerging from Africa that colours were being used in a symbolic way perhaps 200,000 years ago, a UK scientist working in the region claims.

      Lawrence Barham has been studying tools and other artefacts left by ancient humans at a site in Zambia.

      He says the range of mineral pigments, or ochres, found there hints at the use of paint, perhaps to mark the body.

      If correct, it would push back the earliest known example of abstract thinking by at least 100,000 years.


  8. The Carbon Cycle On Early Earth-And On Mars?, Phil. Tran. Biol. Sc. Bookmark and Share

    Excerpt: One of the goals of the present Martian exploration is to search for evidence of extinct (or even extant) life. This could be redefined as a search for carbon. The carbon cycle (or, more properly, cycles) on Earth is a complex interaction among three reservoirs: the atmosphere; the hydrosphere; and the lithosphere. Superimposed on this is the biosphere, and its presence influences the fixing and release of carbon in these reservoirs over different time-scales. The overall carbon balance is kept at equilibrium on the surface by a combination of tectonic processes (which bury carbon), volcanism (which releases it) and biology (which mediates it). (...)

  9. Neanderthals And Humans Lived Side By Side, New Scientist Bookmark and Share

    Excerpts: The environment is rich and diverse, which perhaps enabled the last of the Neanderthal stragglers to survive a little longer than most. Finlayson estimates that only a small group lived in the cave itself.

    Although modern humans were breeding all around them, we are not thought to have actively exterminated the Neanderthals.

    ¡§Fragmented populations survived in southern localities and their final extinction may have been due to their small numbers,¡¨ says Finlayson. ¡§Modern humans played a minor or no role in this.¡¨


  10. Temporal And Spatial Enumeration Processes In The Primate Parietal Cortex, Science Bookmark and Share

    Excerpts: Humans and animals can nonverbally enumerate visual items across time in a sequence or rapidly estimate the set size of spatial dot patterns at a single glance. We found that temporal and spatial enumeration processes engaged different populations of neurons in the intraparietal sulcus of behaving monkeys. Once the enumeration process was completed, however, another neuronal population represented the cardinality of a set irrespective of whether it had been cued in a spatial layout or across time.

    1. How Animals Learn From Each Other, Appl. Animal Behav. Sc. Bookmark and Share

      Excerpts: This paper explores ways by which animals may learn from one another, using examples drawn mostly from the chicken, an animal for which social learning is likely to be less dangerous than individual learning. In early life, the behaviour of the hen is important in encouraging chicks to peck at edible items. Maternal display not only attracts chicks to profitable food items, but also redirects their attention away from harmful or non-profitable items. (...) Hens have been trained to perform a novel behaviour (key-pecking for food) by observation of a trained demonstrator bird. (...)
      • Source: How Animals Learn From Each Other, C. Nicol - c.j.nicolabristol.ac.uk, DOI: 10.1016/j.applanim.2006.04.004, Applied Animal Behaviour Science, Oct. 2006, online 2006/05/11
      • Contributed by Pritha Das - prithadas01ayahoo.com

    2. Into The Brains Of Whales, Appl. Animal Behav. Sc. Bookmark and Share

      Excerpt: Whilst studies on cetaceans have focused on a few populations of just a few species, various complex behaviours and social structures that support the notion that cetaceans should be regarded as intelligent animals have been revealed. The evidence to support this is reviewed here and is best developed for some odontocete species, although recent studies on minke whales show that the behaviour of baleen whales may be more complex than previously thought. As one consequence of high intelligence, the potential impacts of whaling and other removals may be far greater than they appear (...).
      • Source: Into The Brains Of Whales, M. P. Simmonds - mark.simmondsawdcs.org, DOI: 10.1016/j.applanim.2006.04.015, Applied Animal Behaviour Science, Oct. 2006, online 2006/05/15
      • Contributed by Pritha Das - prithadas01ayahoo.com

  11. Washing Away Your Sins: Threatened Morality And Physical Cleansing, Science Bookmark and Share

    Excerpts: Physical cleansing has been a focal element in religious ceremonies for thousands of years. The prevalence of this practice suggests a psychological association between bodily purity and moral purity. In three studies, we explored what we call the "Macbeth effect"¡Xthat is, a threat to one's moral purity induces the need to cleanse oneself. This effect revealed itself through an increased mental accessibility of cleansing-related concepts, a greater desire for cleansing products, and a greater likelihood of taking antiseptic wipes.

    1. Hybrid Elections Broaden Complexity-Theoretic Resistance to Control, arXiv Bookmark and Share

      Excerpt: Electoral control refers to attempts by an election's organizer (``the chair'') to influence the outcome by adding/deleting/partitioning voters or candidates. The groundbreaking work of Bartholdi, Tovey, and Trick [BTT92] on (constructive) control proposes computational complexity as a means of resisting control attempts: Look for election systems where the chair's task in seeking control is itself computationally infeasible. (...)

  12. Bad-News Beauties Poison-Spined Fish From Asia Have Invaded U.S. Waters, Science Bookmark and Share

    Excerpts:
    BOLD AND COLORFUL. Unlike native reef fish, these red lionfish photographed 50 miles east of North Carolina quickly grow large enough to prey on other fish. Meanwhile, would-be predators find them unappetizing. D. Kesling/NOAA Undersea Res. Ctr.
    With striking red, black, and white stripes decorating its body, fins, and some dozen spines along its head, back, and sides, the red lionfish is at once beautiful and frightening. The football-shaped fish can grow up to 18 inches long and is poisonous to the touch. At smaller sizes, this subtropical fish from Asia is extremely popular for hobbyists with saltwater aquariums, but the red lionfish is a major worry to government biologists charged with protecting native species in the wild.

  13. The Art Of The Possible, Technology Review Bookmark and Share

    Excerpts: (...) the Hunch Engine is software that uses evolutionary algorithms to breed solutions to science, engineering, business, or design problems--solutions that no human mind could have predicted. Icosystem claims that evolutionary algorithms expose ideas to a kind of natural selection, (...)."

    Last year, the French postal agency La Poste hired Icosystem (...). On the first day, Bonabeau recounts, Icosystem handed a set of six route options to each of the city's 40 mail carriers. The carriers handed in their ranked choices the next morning, and these were fed into the Hunch Engine.


    1. Top Prize For 'Light' Inventor, BBC News Bookmark and Share

      Excerpts: A Japanese scientist who invented environmentally friendly sources of light has been awarded this year's Millennium Technology Prize.

      Professor Shuji Nakamura was given the 1m Euro (?680,000) prize at a ceremony in Helsinki, Finland.

      The award recognised his inventions of blue, green and white light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and the blue laser diode.

      White LEDs could provide a sustainable, low-cost alternative to lightbulbs, especially in developing countries.



    2. Inpaint By Numbers, Scientific American Magazine Bookmark and Share

      Summary: Astute moviegoers may have noticed a traveling car and its trail of exhaust in a scene from Peter Jackson's The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring. (...) But new software using advanced mathematics may soon enable video editors to automatically inpaint a moving object quickly and seamlessly. It can even massage away large moving objects that hide other action, according to the software's principal developer, computer scientist Guillermo Sapiro of the University of Minnesota. (...)

    3. Ballbots, Scientific American Magazine Bookmark and Share

      Excerpts: The dream of intelligent, mobile robots that assist people during their day-to-day activities in homes, offices and nursing facilities is a compelling one. Although a favorite subject of science-fiction writers and robotics researchers, the goal seems always to lie well off in the future, however. Engineers have yet to solve fundamental problems involving robotic perception and world modeling, automated reasoning, manipulation of objects and locomotion.

      Researchers have produced robots that, while falling far short of the ideal, can do some remarkable things.

      • Source: Ballbots, Ralph Hollis, Scientific American Magazine, 06/10

    4. Artificial Arrays Could Help Submarines Make Like A Fish Bookmark and Share

      Excerpts: An interdisciplinary team has developed nanostructures that mimic how marine animals hunt, evade predators, (...)

      As you read, tiny hair cells in your inner ear amplify and convert sound waves into electrical signals that can alert you (...). Similar structures on other animals, such as seal whiskers and the hairs on spider legs, help those organisms to track prey and evade predators. Now, engineers and biologists have developed the world's first functional artificial hair cell to mimic one of nature's most widespread and versatile data-collecting systems: the lateral lines of fish.


  14. Simple Rules For A Complex Quantum World; The Edge Of Physics, Scientific American Bookmark and Share

    Summary: Over the past few decades, scientists have learned that simple rules can give rise to very rich behavior. A good example is chess. Imagine you're an experienced chess player introduced to someone claiming to know the game. You play a few times and realize that although this person knows the rules of chess, he has no idea how to play well. He makes absurd moves, sacrificing his queen for a pawn and losing a rook for no reason at all.

  15. Emergence Is Coupled To Scope, Not Level, arXiv Bookmark and Share

    Excerpts: Since its application to systems, emergence has been explained in terms of levels of observation. This approach has led to confusion, contradiction, incoherence and at times mysticism. When the idea of level is replaced by a framework of scope, resolution and state, this confusion is dissolved. We find that emergent properties are determined by the relationship between the scope of macrostate and microstate descriptions. This establishes a normative definition of emergent properties and emergence that makes sense of previous descriptive definitions of emergence.

  16. Discovering Functional Communities in Dynamical Networks, arXiv Bookmark and Share

    Excerpt: Many networks are important because they are substrates for dynamical systems, and their pattern of functional connectivity can itself be dynamic -- they can functionally reorganize, even if their underlying anatomical structure remains fixed. However, the recent rapid progress in discovering the community structure of networks has overwhelmingly focused on that constant anatomical connectivity. In this paper, we lay out the problem of discovering functional communities, and describe an approach to doing so. (...)

  17. Sea Animals Get Tagged For Double-Duty Research, Science Bookmark and Share

    Excerpts: But in addition to the bounty of information on the animals' movements, their dives also pointed to a new method for scooping up hard-to-get information about the ocean that's useful for climate research. The method promises a wealth of physical data from the deep that will soon dwarf the amount gathered by ships and research buoys.(...)

    The group is tagging 70 southern elephant seals, who then spend much of their time diving and feeding under the Antarctic pack ice.

    Antarctic data are critical for the study of ocean circulation (...).


  18. Catalyst Hosts Forum On Complexity And Economic Policy, Yahoo! Finance Bookmark and Share

    Excerpts: Science whiz or Econ junkie, you can now further your expertise with the innovative interdisciplinary field exploring the structure, behavior and dynamics of complex systems known as Complexity Science. Catalyst's "Forum on Complexity and Economic Policy," to be held September 26th at the International Monetary Fund in Washington, DC will be the third forum in a planned four-part series. The Keynote Speaker for the forum will be Dr. W. Brian Arthur, External Professor of the Santa Fe Institute.

  19. Complex Challenges: Global Terrorist Network Bookmark and Share


    1. Bin Laden Trail 'Stone Cold', Washington Post Bookmark and Share

      Excerpts: The clandestine U.S. commandos whose job is to capture or kill Osama bin Laden have not received a credible lead in more than two years. Nothing from the vast U.S. intelligence world -- no tips from informants, no snippets from electronic intercepts, no points on any satellite image -- has led them anywhere near the al-Qaeda leader, according to U.S. and Pakistani officials.

      "The handful of assets we have have given us nothing close to real-time intelligence" that could have led to his capture, said one counterterrorism official, who said the trail, despite the most extensive manhunt in U.S. history, has gone "stone cold."


    2. Saddam 'Had No Link To Al-Qaeda', BBC News Bookmark and Share

      Excerpts: There is no evidence of formal links between Iraqi ex-leader Saddam Hussein and al-Qaeda leaders prior to the 2003 war, a US Senate report says.

      The finding is contained in a 2005 CIA report released by the Senate's Intelligence Committee on Friday.

      US President George W Bush has said that the presence of late al-Qaeda leader Abu Musab al-Zarqawi in Iraq before the war was evidence of a link.


    3. 'War On Terror' Loses Clear Direction, BBC News Bookmark and Share

      Excerpts: But Iraq has probably been the greatest single factor in producing the confusion that is now evident. Washington declares that Iraq must be won or the war on terror will be lost. Opponents say it has made things worse, though many opponents add that now it must be won.

      A difficulty for the Bush administration is that it argued differently when the invasion was announced. Then, it was about weapons of mass destruction.


    4. Worried Cia Officers Buy Legal Insurance Plans Fund Defense In Anti-Terror Cases, Washington Post Bookmark and Share

      Excerpts: CIA counterterrorism officers have signed up in growing numbers for a government-reimbursed, private insurance plan that would pay their civil judgments and legal expenses if they are sued or charged with criminal wrongdoing, according to current and former intelligence officials and others with knowledge of the program.

      The new enrollments reflect heightened anxiety at the CIA that officers may be vulnerable to accusations they were involved in abuse, torture, human rights violations and other misconduct, including wrongdoing related to the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks.


    5. Bush Tells Group He Sees A 'Third Awakening', Washinton Post Bookmark and Share

      Excerpts: President Bush said yesterday that he senses a "Third Awakening" of religious devotion in the United States that has coincided with the nation's struggle with international terrorists, a war that he depicted as "a confrontation between good and evil." (...)

      Bush has been careful discussing the battle with terrorists in religious terms since he had to apologize for using the word "crusade" in 2001. He often stresses that the war is not against Islam but against those who corrupt it.


  20. Links & Snippets Bookmark and Share


    1. Other Publications Bookmark and Share

      1. Searching for Memories, Sudoku, Implicit Check-bits, and the Iterative Use of Not-always-correct Rapid Neural Computation, J. J. Hopfield, 2005/09/05, arXiv, DOI: q-bio.NC/0609006
      2. Multiple Copies of a Mystery Gene May Make Us Human, Erika Check, 2006/06/31, News@Nature, DOI: 10.1038/news060828-5
      3. Maths 'Nobel' Prize Declined by Russian Recluse, Jenny Hogan, 2006/08/22, News@Nature, DOI: 10.1038/news060821-5
      4. Chinese Broadband To Be Biggest In The World By 2007: Massive Uptake Over This Year Will Power Country To Pole Position, Ovum Says, J. Brown, 2006/09/04, vnunet.com & Computing
      5. Old Scientists 'Recycled' In Korea: Retired Experts Drafted In To Help Small Firms, S. Burns, 2006/09/06, vnunet.com
      6. Music - The Key To Feeling Good?, 2006/09/06, Innovations-report
      7. Proteins Necessary For Brain Development Found To Be Critical For Long-term Memory, 2006/09/06, ScienceDaily & University Of Massachusetts Amherst
      8. Cracking The Real Da Vinci Code - What Happens In The Artist's Brain?, 2006/09/07, Innovations-report
      9. Mind-body Connection: How Central Nervous System Regulates Arthritis, 2006/09/07, ScienceDaily & University of California - San Diego
      10. Helping Computers Identify Real Meaning, 2006/09/08, Innovations-report
      11. Appetite - It's A Brain Thing, 2006/09/08, Innovations-report
      12. How Did Our Ancestors' Minds Really Work?, 2006/09/08, ScienceDaily & Max Planck Society
      13. Through Animal Eyes: What Behaviour Tells Us, M. S. Dawkins - marian.dawkinsazoo.ox.ac.uk, Oct. 2006, online 2006/05/16, Applied Animal Behaviour Science, DOI: 10.1016/j.applanim.2006.04.010
      14. The Growth Of Information Workers In The US Economy, 1950-2000: The Role Of Technological Change, Computerization, And Structural Change, E. N. Wolff, Sep. 2006, Economic Systems Research, DOI: 10.1080/09535310600844193

    2. Webcast Announcements Bookmark and Share

      1. Potentials of Complexity Science for Business, Governments, and the Media 2006, Budapest, Hungary, 06/08/03-05
      2. 6th Intl Conf on Complex Systems (ICCS), Boston, MA, 06/06/25-30
      3. Artificial Life X, 10th Intl Conf on the Simulation and Synthesis of Living Systems, Bloomington, IN, USA. 2006/06/03-07
      4. 6th Understanding Complex Systems Symposium, Urbana-Champaign, Il, 06/05/15-18
      5. Ralph Abraham on Complexity Digest, , Calcutta, India, 05/12/27
      6. An Afternoon with Michael Crichton, Washington, 05/11/06
      7. Illuminating the Shadow of the Future, Ann Arbor, Mi 05/09/23-25
      8. Open Network of Centres of Excellence in Complex Systems - Brainstorming Meeting, Paris, France 05/09/19-23
      9. Complexity, Science & Society Conference 2005, U. Liverpool, UK 2005/09/11-14
      10. ECAL 2005 - VIIIth European Conference on Artificial Life, Canterbury, Kent, UK 2005/09/5-9
      11. T. Irene Sanders, Executive Director and Founder, The Washington Center for Complexity & Public Policy, 05/08/27, QuickTime video (10:38 min), Podcast
      12. North American Society for the Psychology of Sport and Physical Activity 2005 Conference, Virtual Conference Network, St. Pete's Beach, Florida, 05/06/09-11
      13. Understanding Complex Systems - Computational Complexity and Bioinformatics, Virtual Conference Network, Urbana-Champaign, Il, UIUC, 05/05/16-19
      14. Nonlinearity, Fluctuations, and Complexity, with a celebration of the 65th birthday of Gregoire Nicolis. , Complexity Session, Universite' Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium, 05/03/16
      15. World Economic Forum , Davos, Switzerland, 05/01/26-30
      16. 1st European Conference on Complex Systems, Torino, Italy, 04/12/5-7
      17. From Autopoiesis to Neurophenomenology: A Tribute to Francisco Varela (1946-2001), Paris, France, 2004/06/18-20
      18. Evolutionary Epistemology, Language, and Culture, Brussels, Belgium, 04/05/26-28
      19. International Conference on Complex Systems 2004, Boston, 04/05/16-21
      20. Nonlinear Dynamics And Chaos: Lab Demonstrations, Strogatz, Steven H., Internet-First University Press, 1994
      21. CERN Webcast Service, Streamed videos of Archived Lectures and Live Events
      22. Dean LeBaron's Archive of Daily Video Commentary, Ongoing Since February 1998
      23. Edge Videos


    3. Conference Announcements Bookmark and Share

      1. NECSI Seminar: Introduction to Research in Complex Systems, Cambridge, MA, 06/09/18
      2. 3rd Intl Congress of Nanotechnology 2006 (ICNT 2006) , San Francisco, 06/10/30-11/02
      3. The World Knowledge Dialogue Symposium 2006, Crans-Montana, Switzerland, 06/09/14-16
      4. 7th Intl Symposium on Knowledge and Systems Sciences (KSS'2006), Beijing, 06/09/22-25.
      5. European Conference on Complex Systems 2006 (ECCS'06), Oxford, England, 06/09/25-29
      6. FROM ANIMALS TO ANIMATS 9, The Ninth Intl Conf on the SIMULATION OF ADAPTIVE BEHAVIOR (SAB'06), Roma, Italy, 06/09/25-30
      7. Complexity Science and Economic Policy, Washington, DC, 06/09/26
      8. ECCS 06 - Complexity and Dynamics: Volatility & Stability in City & Regional Systems, Oxford, UK, 06/09/28
      9. 13th Herbstakademie COGNITION AND EMBODIMENT, Monte Verità, Switzerland, 06/10/05-08
      10. Art & Artificial Life International Competition VIDA 9.0 , Deadline: 06/10/16
      11. Weaving Smart Networks: Building Capacity for Positive Change in Organizations and Communities, Washington, DC USA, 06/10/12-13
      12. 2006 Wolfram Technology Conference,Champaign, Illinois, 06/10/12-14
      13. 6th Intl Conf on Simulated Evolution and Learning , Hefei, China, 06/10/15-18
      14. Regulomics Symposium: Focus on Systems Biology, Boston, MA, 06/10/23-26
      15. 8th Annual Intl Leadership Association Conference: Leadership at the Crossroads, Chicago, IIinois, USA, 06/11/01-05
      16. Creating Interdisciplinary Cultures: Insights from Complexity Science and Relationship Centered Care, Indiana USA, 06/11/17-19
      17. Self-Organization And Morphogenesis In Biological Systems , Schloss Ringberg, Germany. 06/12/03-06
      18. Japan Mathematica Conference 2006, Tokyo, Japan, 06/12/12
      19. 2006 IEEE/WIC/ACM Intl Workshop on Interaction between Agents and Data Mining (IADM-06), Hongkong, China, 06/12/18
      20. NECSI Winter School 2007, Cambridge, MA, 07/01/08-19
      21. Logic, Computability and Randomness 2007 , Buenos Aires, Argentina, 07/01/10-13
      22. Managing Complex Organizations in a Complex World, Cambridge, MA, 07/01/25-26
      23. 3rd International Workshop on Complexity and Philisophy, Stellenbosch, South Africa, 07/02/22-23
      24. Complexity and Organizational Resilience The Village, Pohnpei, Micronesia, 07/05
      25. 2nd Intl Conf on Built Environment Complexity - Embracing complexity thinking in built environments, Cape Town South Africa, 07/05/21-25
      26. 2007 IEEE/ICME Intl Conf on Complex Medical Engineering-CME2007, Beijing, China, 07/05/23-27
      27. Summer School In Complexity Science, London, UK, 07/07/08-17
      28. ECAL 2oo7 - 9th European Conference on Artificial Life , Lisbon, Portugal, 07/09/10-14


    4. Call for Papers - Course/Book Announcements Bookmark and Share

      1. Special Issue of the Artificial Life journal on the Evolution of Complexity, Call for Papers
      2. Digital Graphics for Quantitative Finance, Lineplot Productions, 2006

        Why create movies of financial models? Because key stakeholders often don't understand them. The mathematical, data-intensive sphere of quantitative financial analysis can be a black box even for many in the industry. It is vital for users of this analysis to appreciate, understand and buy into, often literally, these difficult and important concepts.

      3. Life: An Introduction to Complex Systems Biology, Kunihiko Kaneko, Springer Series: Understanding Complex Systems, 2006

        What is life? Has molecular biology given us a satisfactory answer to this question? And if not, why, and how to carry on from there? This book examines life not from the reductionist point of view, but rather asks the question: what are the universal properties of living systems and how can one construct from there a phenomenological theory of life that leads naturally to complex processes such as reproductive cellular systems, evolution and differentiation? The presentation has been deliberately kept fairly non-technical so as to address a broad spectrum of students and researchers from the natural sciences and informatics.

      4. Chaos and Complexity Resources for Students and Teachers, 06/03/01



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